The Season for Giving - Beautiful Earthenware Pots

Lisa Pedolsky (local Artist) describes the process in making these beautiful pots. This red clay is called earthenware or terra cotta. It's fired to a lower temperature (around 2000 degrees Fahrenheit) than stoneware or porcelain (2300 degrees or more) and has its own unique characteristics. It’s excellent for hand building, which is my process as opposed to work made on the potters wheel.

Basically, I work with two different versions of this clay body: one with grog, for my larger pieces, and one without, for the small functional work. Grog is clay that has been fired, ground up to the consistency of coarse sand and then added back into the clay I use. It makes for structural integrity when working big (such as the pieces I just delivered, the bottles with lids, flask vases, etc.) and reduces the risk of pieces cracking during drying and/or firing. It also adds porosity to the finished piece. Therefore, large pieces - even if glazed inside - aren’t 100% water tight. If a customer wanted, for example, to put cut flowers in one of these large pieces I’d recommend placing it on a tile or plate to protect furniture.

The smaller pieces - bowls, boxes, etc. - are made from the same earthenware but without grog. This clay is smoother, tighter and holds liquids well after glazing and firing. Thus, these pieces may be used for their perceived purposes.

(Before delivering to the gallery I test the work for water tightness by filling it partially with water. After standing on a piece of paper for several hours or overnight the paper will remain smooth if there’s no porosity or it will wrinkle if any moisture has passed through.)

Basket I - Lisa Pedolsky

Basket I - Lisa Pedolsky

Basket II - Lisa Pedolsky

Basket II - Lisa Pedolsky

Tall Jar - Lisa Pedolsky

Tall Jar - Lisa Pedolsky